Sunday, September 21, 2008

"Something wicked this way comes"

Consider, for a moment, a noble warrior who becomes consumed with ambition to the point that he casts aside the values he once believed in; when he senses that he is in reach of the seat of power he abandons all restraint and does whatever it will take to eliminate his enemies and to solidify his control. Consider, also, a scheming, amoral woman at his side.

Who is it that you see? William Shakespeare wrote Macbeth just over 400 years ago, and it is arguably his most frightening work. The Scottish general who lusts after the throne becomes ever-more consumed with naked ambition as his wife encourages his terrible deeds.

It occurs to me that there are clear parallels between the play and the actions of John McCain. Of course, there are no blood-filled scenes, but "the Thane of Arizona" has clearly sacrificed principles that he seemed to embody back when George W. Bush was doing the smearing and lying. One can imagine a rendezvous with three witches who told McCain that they've seen the future and he can be president -- but only if he is willing to do whatever it takes.

Meanwhile, central casting appears to have been a bit unsatisfied with Lady McCain in her role, so they sent us Sarah Palin, who we can easily imagine grabbing a bloody dagger to finish what her partner began -- just as though she were gutting a moose. In Shakespeare's work, however, guilt consumes Lady Macbeth. Palin does not seem to possess a conscience, and therefore will likely never feel remorse.

7 comments:

John said...

Jimbo, you made my morning.

"Look like the innocent flower,
But be the serpent under it. "

I wouldn't exactly call her an innocent flower, but...


"To show an unfelt sorrow is an office
Which the false man does easy. "

Which sums up most politicians in either party -- especially after hurricanes, market collapses and military funerals.

"What's done is done."
Who knew that Coach Belichick was cribbing from the Bard?

Mary said...

Jim, I had a medical appointment this afternoon and the political scene came up for discussion, if what was offered could even remotely be called discussion.

There was a People magazine available to patients to pass the time. I happened to mention to the nurse "Oh, no, the ubiquitous Sarah Palin. (She was on the cover.) She's everywhere. I can't get away from her at all." Well, here is the nurse's response:

"She's gorgeous...I hope she gets in."

If that is how some women are deciding on their candidate, this country is in more trouble than I originally feared. We have reached the point, once again, where there is a woman candidate for the Vice Presidency and some are vetting their candidate by her hair style, her manicure and her looks.

I guess some would say we have reached parity with men, if you judge by the above criteria.

Jimbo said...

Well, if any decide to look beyond the surface, here is a piece on the real Palin: http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2008/09/23/palin/index.html?source=rss&aim=/news/feature

N.starluna said...

There was a poll done last week by NYT/CBS which found that the top five reasons for liking Palin were (in order):
1. Honest
2. Tough/figher
3. Caring
4. Outspoken
5. Fresh-faced

One critic stated that it sounds like a talk show host rather than a vice president.

There is a danger of paying too much attention to Palin, but I do think its important to be critical of her credentials. In the 20th century alone, 5 vice-presidents rose to the presidency with the death or resignation of the president (Teddy Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge, Harry Truman, Lyndon Johnson, and Gerald Ford).

Jimbo said...

And none of those five were 72 when elected.

John R. said...

Jimbo, talk about journalistic integrity, that article cites a convicted fellon and several political opponents. "After Vic's indictment, she didn't give him the time of day". Priceless! Barack would never denounce Bill Ayers.

Mary said...

Here is the reality of the possible consequences of our voting actions:

McCain wins, has a heart attack or dies of old age in office, leaves us with Palin to learn on the job about foreign policy and the intricacies of running a federal government.

Obama wins, may be targeted by an assassin, may die, leaves us with Joe Biden, who clearly has a solid foundation of foreign policy knowledge and a familiarity with the government's day-to-day operations.

I can't answer for anyone else, but my money is on Obama and his choice for a possible successor in case the President is unable to complete his term.